What I Wish I’d Known About Finances

I find that one of the most common missing ingredients in the leaders I work with is adequate training.
I don’t mean that they haven’t received adequate training. I mean they fail to provide adequate training to those they lead.
Leaders like to lead. We love to come up with a vision and then marshal the troops to get the job done. But as leaders, we often fail to explain the why behind the what. The result is often a team that knows what to do but has no clue why they need to do it – or do it that way.

EVERYBODY LOVES ME and has a wonderful plan for my church, people, and money!

I don’t know about you, but I’m sure tired of ministry leaders who assume that their BIG VISION for mobilizing the body of Christ automatically trumps my smaller vision for our local church.

Yet, it happens all the time. A parachurch organization, a denominational leader or local pastor comes up with a plan to mobilize the body of Christ at large in order to do something great for God. It’s always a cause that’s hard to argue with: an evangelistic outreach, church planting, a mission project, a compassion drive, a citywide prayer meeting or even a political agenda that can only be pulled off if we all mobilize to fend off the latest crisis de jour.

Is There Such a Thing as Faith Without Obedience?

At North Coast Church I’ve long used the word picture of giving the steering wheel of our life over to Jesus to describe what it means to become a follower of Christ. Periodically I get emails, letters, and comments on this blog from folks who object to that imagery. Usually, it’s from someone concerned about one of two extremes – …

The Recipe for a Successful Pastor

I find that one of the most common missing ingredients in the leaders I work with is adequate training.
I don’t mean that they haven’t received adequate training. I mean they fail to provide adequate training to those they lead.
Leaders like to lead. We love to come up with a vision and then marshal the troops to get the job done. But as leaders, we often fail to explain the why behind the what. The result is often a team that knows what to do but has no clue why they need to do it – or do it that way.

Making Room at the Top

In high school, I noticed a strange phenomenon. The freshmen got smaller every year. It was really weird.

When my friends and I walked onto campus for the first day of our freshman year we were legit high schoolers, admittedly a little intimidated by the seniors, but plenty cool in our own right.

Not so with the punks that came in the next year. Something must have happened at the middle school to stunt their growth. None of the new ninth graders were anywhere near as big, smart, or mature as we had been the year before.

Innovation’s Blind Spot

If Innovation’s Dirty Little Secret is that most innovations fail, innovation’s blind spot is the failure to see that protecting the past is as important as creating the future.

Recently, while discussing what makes for a successful serial innovator™ with a group of pastors and business leaders, I was struck again that when it comes to leadership and innovation, all the sex appeal is on creating the future. But all the peril comes from failing to protect the past.

Slow Down – You Move Too Fast!

Because North Coast Church has been somewhat innovative over the years and successfully made lots of changes, I’m often asked by other pastors and leaders about the best way to go about making major organizational and ministry changes.

My answer often surprises them. I usually tell them to, “Slow down.” It’s not what they expect from someone with a reputation as an innovator. Now let me be clear. I don’t tell them to stop. No way. But I often tell them to slow down. And here’s why:

The Forgotten Side of Leadership

I find that one of the most common missing ingredients in the leaders I work with is adequate training.
I don’t mean that they haven’t received adequate training. I mean they fail to provide adequate training to those they lead.
Leaders like to lead. We love to come up with a vision and then marshal the troops to get the job done. But as leaders, we often fail to explain the why behind the what. The result is often a team that knows what to do but has no clue why they need to do it – or do it that way.

Time or Task? How Many Hours Should Staff Members Work? (Part 2)

In my last post, I pointed out that asking how many hours a staff member should work is asking the wrong question.

– and worse, it’s a question with two different right answers. I then proceeded to look at the question of how many hours from a leader’s perspective. In this post we’ll look at it from a staff member’s perspective. From a leader’s perspective, the question of how many hours a staff member spends on the job or in the office is irrelevant (assuming of course their job is not to answer phones or be constantly available in a support role).